FAQs

Iceland is the westernmost country in Europe, it lies midway between North America and mainland Europe, and its northern coast is just below the Arctic Circle.

Geologically speaking is Iceland Europe’s youngest country and the second largest island, around 103,000 sq.km. Iceland was the last European country to be settled by man and the present population is approx. 320.000.

Half of Iceland’s population lives in the capital Reykjavík and its neighbouring towns in the southwest. The center of the country and highlands are uninhabited.

In Iceland you find unique, rugged, wild, amazing and the greatest contrasts possible in Mother Nature. Glaciers, craters, Geysers (hot springs), active volcanoes, black sand beaches and extensive lava fields are amongst the many things the island hast to offer.

Summer temperatures are around 15°C with the north and east often being the warmest parts in the summer but coldest in winter. Average January temperatures in Reykjavík, at around zero, are actually higher than those in New York.

Light clothing is often all you need in the summer, but always be prepared for both cold and wet at ALL time of the year. The weather in Iceland is extremely changeable and Icelanders often say, “If you don’t like the weather, just wait 15 minutes”.
You should always bring a bathing suit, whatever time of the year you visit Iceland. Icelanders favourite pastime is year-round outdoor swimming in countless geothermally heated pools and lagoons, with typical temperatures of 25-28°C.

Yes. A passport or other travel document accepted by Icelandic authorities valid at least three months beyond intended stay is required for visitors to Iceland. For further information, visit www.utl.is

Once you are in Iceland, you may not need to carry it around with you; but be sure to have some kind of identification on you at all times. 

The biggest part of the experience (visiting) is obviously the amazing contrasts of the Icelandic nature, but far from being the only thing! Reykjavík and Akureyri are one of the liveliest, safest, modern, most sophisticated cities there are, and the nightlife and cultural activities have earned an exciting reputation.

Half of Iceland’s population lives in the capital Reykjavík and its neighbouring towns in the southwest. The center of the country and highlands are uninhabited.

In Iceland you find unique, rugged, wild, amazing and the greatest contrasts possible in Mother Nature. Glaciers, craters, Geysers (hot springs), active volcanoes, black sand beaches and extensive lava fields are amongst the many things the island hast to offer.

Exceptionally friendly, highly educated, sophisticated, attractive, honest, and very modest ? Our ancestors were predominantly Norwegian, although some came from the British Isles. Most Icelanders speak English fluently. In fact, they welcome the opportunity. So, don’t be shy about approaching an Icelander.

The currency in Iceland is the Icelandic Krona. Please check for online rates to see what your conversion to your currency would be. 

Service and VAT are invariably included in prices in Iceland and tipping is never required. However, if you are very pleased with the service, Icelanders are generally not offended if they are offered tips, but it is not necessary. 

The most important of all the FAQs. The truth is a large portion of the population refuse to say that they don’t believe in them, and people respect traditions associated with them. Just in case they are real. So whilst there are few people who openly say that they do…the actions (which speak louder than words) of the majority indicate that yes, we do believe in the hidden folk. Learn more here. 

faqs
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